Trauma Team Training

the course | the facts

Trauma Team Training

Trauma refers to an injury that is physically or emotionally inflicted. Medically, “trauma” refers to a serious or critical bodily injury, wound, or shock. In psychiatry, “trauma” refers to an experience that is emotionally painful, distressful, or shocking, which often results in lasting mental and physical effects. Especially areas in Africa where there is or has been political conflict, trauma is a common cause of human suffering.

Even if the trauma unit personnel are trained in their respective disciplines, the trauma patient will not receive adequate care if the personnel do not know how to work together efficiently and effectively.
TTTNE

 

The Course

Final team exercise, TTT course Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in 2006. Photo © R. Lett

The Trauma Team Training Course (TTT), as well as First Aid training were implemented in response to the increasing need for training in low and middle income countries. The instructional unit  emphasized in the TTT Course is the team, not the individual. This concept was developed by the initial authors Drs. Olive Kobusingye and Dr. Ronald Lett.   Patients who are injured are likely to be cared for by one of several of a technical team made up of clinical officers, anesthetic officers, orthopedic technicians and nurses. The TTT course prepares teams of 5 to care for trauma victims with the limited resources found at African rural hospital and health centers.

 

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The Facts

From TTT course in Georgetown, Guyana 2009. Photo © R. Lett

 

 

 

Team Exercise. Simulation Single System Trauma Case

 

The Trauma Team Training has been  conducted as part of the injury prevention programs in Tanzania Ethiopia and Uganda. Currently the course is actively being conducted in Tanzania and Guyana.  The initial TTT courses were supported by the Harbinger Foundation of Toronto and the  Wild Rose Foundation of Alberta. First Aid courses have been developed  and taught to school teachers and police officers, who are often the first to arrive at a scene of injury